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People-Watching



Most mornings, I fill my time on the bus by reading a book. The ride tends to be between 20 and 30 minutes, depending on which bus you take and what time you leave. Usually I'm happy for the time - especially if I'm really enjoying my book. (I'm reading the Da Vinci Code at the moment and am REALLY enjoying my book)

And occasionally, as I sit, perched in my favourite bus seat, my eyes will wander out to the sidewalk, watching the people walking into the centre as I'm going out.

Today, I shared a moment with a young lady and she didn't even know it.

She was dressed in a convenience store outfit with a fleece overtop to keep her warm on her walk.

She had her brown hair tied back, with little or no make up on but a great clear complextion. Probably in her early twenties.

I'm guessing she didn't have children because she didn't have that tired, haggard look that young mom's seem to get. Her face was bright, glowing even and held up high as she strode along the sidewalk.

Her expression was indescript - just that plain, monotone look people tend to get when they are out walking in public and simply want to get to where they're going.

I remember that look from so many places. Subways. Airports. Bus queues. Museum lineups. Train platforms.

People - simply wanting to blend into the background of the urban landscape. Speaking to themselves in their minds as they sift through thoughts of the coming day.

So when this brown haired girl walked by, I wasn't really conscious of needing to look at her for more then a glance. And just as I was about to look back down to my book, it happened.

A grand grin appeared on her face. She shook her head slightly, cocked it to the side and smiled a big smile - to herself.

In that instant, I caught her thinking. About a lover? A friend? A friend she wants to be a lover? A joke her mother or father or brother told her? A moment she shared? A dream she had?

The possibilities of the thought were endless. What could it possibly be?

So many times during the day we have emotions that occur simply from thoughts that we have. No one is actually doing anything in the present to stir this emotion. It is merely our recollection of the moment that makes us feel.

And even as we try to camaflouge ourselves behind the stoic mask we wear when going from point A to point B, there is always a chance someone will get a little glimpse into more than just the indifferent face.

It doesn't take but a second to share this type of moment with someone. Because before I knew it, it was over.

The bus was off and the girl was gone, walking in the opposite direction of my destination.

I felt privelaged to have seen it. Like something lifted my head up at the exact moment from my pages to peek at someone else's life.

Perhaps a bit too deep and reflective for the bus ride in. My motivation and productivity must be back.

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