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Welcome Little Miss Norah A

You are the reason I have not updated this blog in so long. I really didn't want to say anything on this site until I had a chance to properly welcome you into the world with a few words from me.

You will now join company with 'The Kid', to whom I try to write to, although not as frequently as I should. Your arrival has reminded me I need to more often.

You are most likely wondering who I am.

You've met your goofy dad. You've met your sweet mom. You've met the rest of our crazy family, including your granny - who's head about exploded with excitement into the days leading up to the arrival, your granted - who, from past experience, is an expert at wretching open sliding doors to a hospital emergency room if you find yourself in your parents arms having convulsion within the first year of your life. (I digress but please don't do that to your parents. I'd did it four times and it was SO NOT COOL for them. Me, I don't even remember)

You've no doubt met your uncle, who specifically requested you come with a padded baby suit so that he would never have to worry while babysitting.

You've definitely met your aunt, who in between saving the world from their own unhealthy ways, will no doubt babysit on many occasions.

You have also met your great grandma, who is so happy she can't even speak about you without gushing or crying. This also goes for your great grandpa, although he has done a bit better job at the no-crying bit.

You have not, however met me but I am your middle-name sake.

When your dad told me, after a day of golfing, bbq and a few wee tipples, that if his first born child was a girl he was going to name her Norah A, the first thing I said was:

'Is that because you like the name A?'

He looked at me:

'No,' he smiled and just waited to watch my reaction. 'You've always been there for us.'

Gulp. Sniff Sniff.

I don't know if I'll ever be able to describe the honor that it was to think that if a little girl came into their lives, she would have something the same as me. So much so that I didn't believe him.

But here you are, over two weeks old, named Little Norah A. And I got to speak to your dad the day after you were born! Someday you will laugh at the thought that he still decided to answer the phone even though he was naked brushing his teeth.

He has lost so many of his senses to eternal glee after your birth that he suddenly became what we all become 'A parent who doesn't get embarassed'. I realise now that it's because all other things must have ceased to become important the moment he looked into your eyes.

You'll soon learn that your dad is a bit of a joker but he has such a soft heart, he'd never use his humor to hurt anyone. He has a laugh that fills the room and a cheeky smile that keeps him out of trouble. Someday you must master this smile as it will help to keep you out of trouble with him, although I don't know if you're going to be allowed to leave the house until your 30 so not sure how much trouble you'll actually get in. He is the most honest down to earth person I know. He is someone who will always stand in your corner, no matter what.

Your mom has the kindest heart. She is caring and gentle and she managed to bring out all the best in your dad for all these years. She will play with you and laugh with you and definitely give you fantastic hugs when you are feeling low. She tried very hard to get you here so please remember that when you're 15 rolling your eyes at her because she wants to give you a kiss goodbye before she drops you off at school.

You are the first generation after my generation on my father's side of the family. That's a lot of words that sound like a mouthful but its meaning is simple. You are very special.

Not just to your mom and dad and the rest of the gang above but especially to me.

You are the beginning of exciting years to come. You will learn all about air bands and human pyramids. You will enjoy bbqs and golf games and swimming and lots and lots of laughter.

You have helped to create a whole knew level of friendship amongst the cousins in our family. You have single-handedly made all the old people in our family beam so much I can hear it in their voices over the phone.

You have brought life to all of us.

I can't wait to meet you but until then, Little Miss Norah A, sleep for your mom, smile for your dad and always remember you are loved beyond the ocean.

Your Aunt A

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